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21st Annual Northwest Patient Safety Conference

The 21st Northwest Patient Safety Conference

“Safe Patient Care: It Takes All of Us”
Focusing on what we can do together for safety

 October 15th and 16th, 2024
Presented in collaboration with the Oregon Patient Safety Commission and Health Quality BC

Conference Registration is Open!

Click on the Registration tab to the left to register

Welcome to our 21st conference! The theme is “Safe Patient Care: It Takes All of Us.” At its most basic level, health care boils down to one-on-one interactions between people. The conference will focus on what patients, residents and providers can do together to improve safety, quality, and outcomes. We have truly great faculty offering 14 hours of programming. Presentations will be recorded and available for a year. We’ve expanded our available CE credits, too.

The conference keynote will be given by Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, one of the foremost voices in the medical world today, speaking passionately about the doctor-patient relationship. The author of When We Do Harm, she places the issues of medical error and patient safety front and center in our national healthcare conversation. Dr. Ofri researches what patients can do to protect themselves, how to ensure hospitals and doctors are not committing preventable errors, what happens when the checklist is not enough to prevent harm, how racial and economic inequities worsen care, and what steps medical professionals and institutions can take to improve patient safety.

PRESENTATION SAMPLE

  • Cynthia Clark, Founder of Civility MattersTM, Professor Emeritus at Boise State University, and an award-winning professor, scholar, and author. Dr. Clark’s ground-breaking work on fostering civility and healthy work environments has brought national and international attention to the controversial issues of incivility in academic and work environments around the globe.
  • Elizabeth Reis, PhD, has spent her career exploring both the history and contemporary analysis of medical ethics, sexuality, and religion. She will speak on intersex, medical ethics and who should decide things about their bodies.
  • Barbara Kohnen Adriance, MPP, leads the LiveWell project through her company, The Malden Collective. LiveWell is an innovative long-term care program that results in better staff retention, fewer staff absences, and fewer workplace injuries. They also have fewer falls and medication errors. Staff have higher morale. They are able to make a difference and are better at caring for older adults and people with disabilities.
  • Learn about British Columbia’s Patient Voices Network, a community of patients, families, and caregivers who team up with health care professionals to improve health care in British Columbia. If you are directing or a patient participating in a PFAC you’ll want to attend this.
  • There will be hours of “shop talks” including cognitive interviewing, shared decision making, diagnostic improvement, safety measurement, restorative approach to harm, and more.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

  • Patient safety practitioners, risk managers, quality leaders, and healthcare executives.
  • Clinical program leaders and frontline clinicians from across the spectrum of care.
  • Claims representatives and insurance professionals.
  • Patient advocates and patient experience officers, patient and family advisory council members.
  • Graduate and undergraduate health professions students. FREE ATTENDENCE!
  • Interested patients, family members of patients, and community members. FREE ATTENDENCE!

INFORMATION

Venue: Virtual

Dates: October 15 & 16, Time: 7:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Pacific.

Continuing Education: Nursing Contact Hours, CPHQ, CPPS, CPHRM, and BCPA professional certifications

Fees:

  • Healthcare professionals and anyone seeking continuing educational credits, $85 US.
  • Discounts are offered for registrants with CPHQ, CPPS, CPHRM, and BCPA professional certifications.
  • Patients, their families, and healthcare profession students attend free.

Registration questions? Contact wpsc@qualityhealth.org

Sponsor Opportunities Are Available!

We are pleased to invite interested sponsors to support our 21st annual conference. All sponsors will be recognized on the Washington Patient Safety Coalition website and marketing materials. In addition to those benefits, there are several packages that offer improved visibility and marketing options. As a sponsor you are helping to subsidize the cost of the conference to healthcare staff and provide free attendance to patients, families, and students. Sponsorship applications, benefits and details are available HERE.

About the Washington Patient Safety Coalition
The Washington Patient Safety Coalition brings together a diverse group of participants to focus on achieving common patient safety goals. Our mission is to improve safety for patients receiving health care in Washington, in all care settings, with a vision of safe care for every patient, every time, everywhere. The WPSC is a program of the Foundation for Health Care Quality, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing a trusted, independent, third-party resource to all participants in the health care community – including patients, providers, payers, employers, government agencies, and public health professionals.

About the Northwest Patient Safety Conference
Now in its 20th year, the Northwest Patient Safety Conference is the only event of its kind in the Western US, uniting healthcare professionals, providers, patients, families, and caregivers from all care settings for networking and engaging in sessions with industry thought leaders invested in improving the patient experience. This year’s conference is our second virtual conference, and our second year in collaboration between the Washington Patient Safety Coalition, the Oregon Patient Safety Commission, and Health Quality BC.

Members of the conference committee who are putting on this fantastic conference

Amelina Kassa                          Jo Sedman
Anita Sulaiman                        Naomi Kirtner
David Birnbaum                      Rex Johnson
Farinaz Havaei                         Rhonda Bowen
Jamie Leviton                           Valerie Harmon
Jeff Goldenberg                        Yanling Yu                       

This year’s conference is presented in collaboration with the Oregon Patient Safety Commission and Health Quality BC.

Conference Format: Virtual, you will receive a secure link to the conference presentations.

Dates and times: October 15 & 16, 2024

Total presentations: 14

Fees:

  • Healthcare professionals and anyone seeking continuing educational credits, $85
  • Patients, their families, and healthcare profession students attend free
  • Discounts are offered for registrants with CPHQ, CPPS, CPHRM, and BCPA professional certifications.

Payments accepted: all major credit cards via PayPal.

Continuing educational credits: Attendees are eligible for Nursing Contact Hours, CPHQ, CPPS, CPHRM, and BCPA educational credits. These may be acquired by attending the live sessions or watching the recorded sessions up to the next conference in October 2025.

*Recorded educational credit availability is determined by the accrediting organization. Attendees will request CE credits via a conference survey following the conference or via a form on the recorded conference website. PLEASE NOTE THE CREDIT AMOUNTS MAY CHANGE IF THE AGENDA CHANGES.

Credit Type Total Credits Credits Available

Check back in August. Typically, 14.

BCPA
CPHQ
CPHRM
CPPS
Nursing Contact Hours

 

Registration questions? Contact wpsc@qualityhealth.org or call Steve Levy, Executive Director, 206-204-7383.

Opening Keynote - When We Do Harm - Danielle Ofri

Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, is one of the foremost voices in the medical world today, shining an unflinching light on the realities of healthcare and speaking passionately about the doctor-patient relationship.

She writes about medicine and the doctor-patient connection. Her writing appears in the New York Times, The New Yorker, and the Atlantic, as well as the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine.

Danielle Ofri is a founder and Editor-in-Chief of Bellevue Literary Review, the first literary journal to arise from a medical setting, now an award-winning, independent nonprofit literary arts organization. She is a primary care internist at Bellevue Hospital and a clinical professor of medicine at NYU.

Her lectures to medical and general audiences are renowned for her use of dramatic stories (and avoidance of PowerPoint). Her essays have been selected for Best American Essays (twice) and Best American Science Writing, by Stephen Jay Gould, Oliver Sacks, and Susan Orlean .

Ofri is the recipient of a 2023 Guggenheim Fellowship, the 2023 Davies Scholar Award from the American College of Physicians, the 2022 National Humanism in Medicine Medal from the Gold Foundation, the 2020 Global Listening Legend Award, and has been awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters. She has received the McGovern Award from the American Medical Writers Association for “preeminent contributions to medical communication.”

Danielle Ofri has given TED talks on Deconstructing Perfection and Fear: A Necessary Emotion, and has also performed stories for the Moth. She is featured in the documentaries “Why Doctors Write” and “White Coat Rebels.”

An ever-struggling student of the cello, she is slogging slowly through all 36 movements of the Bach cello suites.

AI for Clinical Diagnosis at the Crossroads A Tale of Two Possible Futures - David Newman-Toker

Most diagnostic errors are associated with issues in bedside diagnostic reasoning and appear to disproportionately reflect failures of expertise, which has the potential to be addressed by AI. Will pursuing an AI path take us towards a future in which it helps us achieve a world where diagnoses are accurate, timely, and effectively communicated to patients, avoiding both diagnostic error and overdiagnosis… a future in which diagnostic processes are patient-centered, evidence-based, prompt, efficient, safe, and equitable? How might we get there?

Learning objectives:

  1. Summarize public health burden & financial impact of diagnostic errors and misdiagnosis-related harms.
  2. Discuss potential pitfalls of applying artificial intelligence (AI) for clinical diagnosis without adequate guardrails.
  3. Describe prerequisites and systems of care essential to deploying AI to achieve diagnostic excellence.

A restorative approach to harm and preparing for uncertainty - Carolyn Canfield

Trust is assumed to be a pre-requisite for patients. However, trust may not sit comfortably with our concepts and practices in risk management, the actual experience of harm and the rocky recovery after harm. Carolyn Canfield will lead this discussion drawing on trust as a throughline in her personal experience with harm, her exploration of system resilience and restorative justice, and a decade of teaching patient safety to medical students.

Leaning objectives

  1. Explain how relationship-building with patients can affect the safety of care and management of risk.
  2. Compose “What’s One Thing…?” questions to open trust-building conversations and learn patient priorities.
  3. Apply a “Social Determinants of Trust” lens on building foundations for trust with patients, right from the start.

Artificial Intelligence and health care: Its applications and hidden dangers

The presentation discusses ethical and legal challenges around artificial intelligence implementation in health care using various types of AI software designs and cutting-edge AI-related health care applications as examples.

Learning objectives:

  1. Define artificial intelligence
  2. Recognize opportunities around how AI can improve health care service delivery
  3. Recognize potential ethical and legal threats around AI implementation

Civility Rising! Best Practices to Inspire Healthy Work Environments - Cynthia Clark

The detrimental impact of workplace incivility is well documented, and if allowed to take root, the consequences can be serious. So, imagine an enjoyable workplace—an environment where you and your colleagues can truly thrive in your career and profession. This engaging and thought-provoking session provides a deepened and empirical understanding of workplace incivility, its impact on individuals, teams, organizations, and patient care—and emphasizes ways to build and sustain healthy work environments. Join a renowned nurse researcher, award-winning professor, and accomplished author for a stimulating session to explore best practices to foster healthy, vibrant work environments.

Learning objectives:

  1. Explore the State of the Science related to civility, incivility, and other forms of workplace aggression.
  2. Describe the impact of incivility on individuals, teams, organizations, and patient care.
  3. Examine individual & organizational competencies to foster healthy, productive work environments.

 

Hard Truths about the Long Term Care Sector: Where do we go from here? - Barbara Kohnen Adriance

As a society, we have failed to provide safe, reliable, person-directed care for older adults and people living with disabilities who reside in long term care facilities. We have also failed to provide safe working environments for the hundreds of thousands of people working in these facilities. It seems that even the high-profile cases don’t generate change.

Yet all the key stakeholders – state regulatory agencies, for profit and non-profit industry associations, and the providers themselves say that they are committed to improving quality and safety. So why aren’t we seeing real change? What will it take to transform this sector?

This event will outline the key drivers of low quality and safety in long term care facilities. We will look at examples of organizations that have taken an innovative staff-centered approach to quality improvement. And we will discuss what’s next. Can we salvage the systems that we have now? Or do we need new models of care? Who needs to be at the table when new ways of care are developed? How will they be regulated? Hint: there’s a role for Oregon and Washington’s patient safety commissions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand why long term care facilities are not safe for residents or staff
  2. Learn how some communities have made change
  3. Become aware of the urgent need for change

Panel - Foundation for Health Care Quality, Healthcare Equity Award Winners

Bree Collaborative and Foundation for Health Care Quality Award winners discuss how they create processes and practices that enhance equity that result in measurable changes in the access to and quality of care for patients.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand  how collaborative care contributes to patient safety and outcomes.
  2. Understand how organizations embed equity principles into best practices.
  3. Understand specifics around quality improvement activities that are focused on equity.

Safety, Risk, and Intersex Management

The term “patient safety” implies keeping patients safe from medical harm. How then might we evaluate harm that derives not from human or system error but from the medical approach itself? This presentation will explore the medical management of intersex traits (atypical sex development). Physicians have been trying to “fix” intersex since the early 19th century, and they have focused on children since the 1950s. Their efforts have been largely motivated by social anxieties about homosexuality and a sense that it would be better for children to grow up with “normal-looking” genitals, a hunch that has turned out to be wrong. Many intersex adults who have endured such “normalizing” surgeries have spoken about the physical and psychological harms that resulted from these cosmetic procedures. Though it might seem risky to let children grow up without them, activists have argued that pediatric genital surgeries violate human rights. “Patient safety” in this context would mean letting children grow up with genital, hormonal, or gonadal difference until they are old enough to make decisions about their bodies for themselves.

Learning objectives

  1. The audience will learn about the historical motivations of intersex management.
  2. The audience will contemplate the meaning of medical harm in the context of pediatric genital surgeries.
  3. The audience will expand their understanding of patient safety when considering children’s rights.

Shared Decision Making as a Strategy for Improving Patient Safety and Strengthening Relationships: One Institution’s Path to a Shared Decision Making Culture

Dr. Simmons will share the experiences of building a culture of shared decision making at Massachusetts General Hospital, with a particular focus on programs in decision aid deployment, involvement of frontline workers in identifying areas for more shared decision making support, and supporting patients to increase their engagement with robust pre-visit preparation.

Learning objectives

  1. Identify clinical areas for shared decision making at your institution
  2. Describe strategies for shared decision making implementation
  3. Examine possible barriers to SDM implementation at your institution and formulate strategies to overcome these barriers

The Leapfrog Group – Informing Decisions and Making Care Safe

Overview of Leapfrog’s national hospital ratings and how they can be used by patients, purchasers, and others to make hospital care safer and higher quality

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about each of Leapfrog’s national ratings programs for hospitals
  2. Participants will learn about which measures are included in each of Leapfrog’s programs
  3. Participants will learn how patients, purchasers, hospitals, and other can use the published ratings

Transforming BC Health Care: The Power of the Patient Voices Network

The Patient Voices Network (PVN) is a community of patients, families, and caregivers who team up with health care professionals to improve health care in British Columbia. Since 2009, PVN has connected thousands of people to work together for better health care. PVN helps build strong partnerships, encourages mutual learning, and involves patients in decision-making to address health care challenges. PVN makes a difference by:
– Building Relationships
– Learning from Each Other

– Understanding Challenges and Opportunities
– Informing Decisions
Join us to hear how PVN’s collaborative approach has transformed health care in BC and learn about the exciting future of health care co-production in the province.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe at least three specific ways in which the Patient Voices Network (PVN) has connected patients, families, caregivers, and health care professionals to improve health care in British Columbia.
  2. Identify and explain at least two effective strategies and provide two examples of successful knowledge sharing and partnership-building between patients and health care teams, as demonstrated by the PVN, after the workshop.
  3. Develop a personal action plan that includes at least three specific steps to apply PVN’s collaborative principles to improve health care decision-making and practice in their own communities.

 

Barbara Kohnen Adriance, MPP

Hard Truths about the Long Term Care Sector: Where do we go from here?

Barbara Kohnen Adriance, MPP is the Founder and CEO of The Malden Collective, a company that provides coaching and training services for teams working in long term care facilities. She is best known for creating the LiveWell Method, a quality assurance and performance improvement method that has reached more than 158 communities nationwide. Barbara has been in the health care sector 15 years, serving previously as head of training and human centered design at CareOregon, a Medicaid managed care organization. Her company has been recognized by the Oregon Department of Human Services as a contributor to improved quality of care and quality of life through its Quality Care Fund grant program. Barbara’s first career was in international policy advocacy in Washington DC, and she has deep regional experience in Central America and Mexico. Now she lives in Portland Oregon with her husband Jim and enjoys family, backpacking, and gardening with native plants.

barbarak@maldencollective.com

Carolyn Canfield

A Restorative Approach to Trust and Preparing for Uncertainty

Carolyn Canfield works as a citizen-patient to expand partnership with patients and caregivers across all facets of healthcare: professional education, service design, practice improvement, policy development, research and governance. Widowed in 2008 by healthcare tragedy led her to full-time activism, earning recognition in 2014 as Canada’s first Patient Safety Champion. In the same year, Carolyn was appointed to faculty in the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia. At UBC, she actively supports the Patient and Community Partnership for Education, the Innovation Support Unit, the Centre for Health Education Scholarship, the Gateway Clinic for interprofessional training in team-based primary care (opening 2025), patient safety curriculum and instruction, enriched learning environments, and medical school candidate selection and admissions policy for the Faculty of Medicine. Provincial, national and international healthcare research roles include patient partner, co-researcher, advisor, funding adjudicator and journal manuscript reviewer. In 2017 Carolyn co-founded the independent peer-led Patient Advisors Network patientadvisors.ca to develop citizen-patient capacity and leadership across Canada. Carolyn was a plenary speaker at the 2014 Northwest Patient Safety Conference.

carolyn.canfield@ubc.ca

Cynthia Clark, PhD, RN

Civility Rising! Best Practices to Inspire Healthy Work Environments

Dr. Cynthia Clark is Founder of Civility MattersTM, Professor Emeritus at Boise State University, and an award-winning professor, scholar, and author. As a clinician, she specialized in adolescent mental health, substance abuse intervention and recovery, and suicide and violence prevention. Dr. Clark’s ground-breaking work on fostering civility and healthy work environments has brought national and international attention to the controversial issues of incivility in academic and work environments around the globe. Her theory-driven interventions, empirical measurements, theoretical models, and reflective assessments provide best practices to ­­prevent, measure, and address uncivil behavior and to create healthy workplaces.

Dr. Clark is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, the NLN Academy of Nursing Education, and served as co-chair for the American Nurses Association Professional Panel on Incivility, Bullying, and Workplace Violence. She is a prolific researcher, presenter, author, and professional blogger. Her presentations number in the hundreds and her publications have appeared in a broad range of peer-reviewed and open-access venues. She is the recipient of numerous teaching, research, and service awards; including 3-time recipient of the Most Inspirational Professor Award, NLN Excellence in Educational Research Award, Journal of Nursing Education Christine A. Tanner Scholarly Writing Award, Nurse Educator Kathleen T. Heinrich Writing Award, Elizabeth Russell Belford Award for Excellence in Education, awarded by Sigma Theta Tau International, and the John P. McGovern Lectureship award conferred by the American Association of Colleges on Nursing. Dr. Clark has been honored as a Distinguished Scholar at 12 universities. The first edition of her book, Creating and Sustaining Civility in Nursing Education,” received 1st place honors as the 2013 AJN Book of the Year. The 2nd edition is now available. Dr. Clark’s newest book, Core Competencies of Civility for Nursing & Healthcare is a must-read for all nurses and health care professionals.

cclark@boisestate.edu

Danielle Ofri, MD

Opening Keynote

Dr. Ofri is one of the foremost voices in the medical world today, shining an unflinching light on the realities of healthcare and speaking passionately about the doctor-patient relationship.

She writes about medicine and the doctor-patient connection. Her writing appears in the New York Times, The New Yorker, and the Atlantic, as well as the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine.

Danielle Ofri is a founder and Editor-in-Chief of Bellevue Literary Review, the first literary journal to arise from a medical setting, now an award-winning, independent nonprofit literary arts organization. She is a primary care internist at Bellevue Hospital and a clinical professor of medicine at NYU.

Her lectures to medical and general audiences are renowned for her use of dramatic stories (and avoidance of PowerPoint). Her essays have been selected for Best American Essays (twice) and Best American Science Writing, by Stephen Jay Gould, Oliver Sacks, and Susan Orlean .

Ofri is the recipient of a 2023 Guggenheim Fellowship, the 2023 Davies Scholar Award from the American College of Physicians, the 2022 National Humanism in Medicine Medal from the Gold Foundation, the 2020 Global Listening Legend Award, and has been awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters. She has received the McGovern Award from the American Medical Writers Association for “preeminent contributions to medical communication.”

Danielle Ofri has given TED talks on Deconstructing Perfection and Fear: A Necessary Emotion, and has also performed stories for the Moth. She is featured in the documentaries “Why Doctors Write” and “White Coat Rebels.”

An ever-struggling student of the cello, she is slogging slowly through all 36 movements of the Bach cello suites.

David Newman-Toker, MD, PhD

AI for Clinical Diagnosis at the Crossroads A Tale of Two Possible Futures

David Newman-Toker, M.D. Ph.D. is Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Otolaryngology, and is the inaugural recipient of the David Robinson Professor in Vestibular Neurology. He holds joint appointments in Emergency Medicine and Health Sciences Informatics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as in Epidemiology and Health Policy & Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Dr. Newman-Toker completed his undergraduate education at Yale University (B.S., 1991) and his medical training at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (M.D., 1995). After completing his Neurology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital (1999), he went on to complete fellowships in Neuro-Ophthalmology at Harvard University/Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary (2000) and in Neuro-Otology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (2002). He completed his doctoral training in clinical research methods at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health through the Graduate Training Program in Clinical Investigation (Ph.D., 2007).

Dr. Newman-Toker’s academic mission is to eliminate harms from diagnostic errors and maximize the accuracy and efficiency of diagnostic testing in clinical practice. He is as a Core Faculty member of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety & Quality, where he serves as Director of the Armstrong Institute Center for Diagnostic Excellence, focused on enhancing diagnostic safety, quality, and value.

toker@jhu.edu

Elizabeth Reis, Ph.D.


Elizabeth Reis, Ph.D.
Is a professor at the Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York where she teaches courses on Medical Ethics; Reproductive Technologies; Gender, Sex, and Bioethics; and Disability Studies. She graduated from Smith College and received her Ph.D. in History at the University of California, Berkeley. Reis is the author of Bodies in Doubt: An American History of Intersex (2nd edition 2021); Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England; and the editor of American Sexual Histories. She has published essays in the Hastings Center Report, Bioethics Forum, Journal of American History, Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, the New York Times, and TIME Magazine. Reis is a member of the Ethics Committee at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Hospital and an editor of Nursing Clio, a collaborative online journal that focuses on the intersection of gender, history, and medicine. She is a former board member of interACT: Advocates for Intersex Youth and a current board member of Talia’s Voice: Projects for Patient Safety.

Living an intersex life, CBS Sunday Morning

Health Equity Award Winners

Kelli Houston
Kelli Houston is the Chief Equity Officer for Community Health Plan of Washington (local not-for-profit, serving vulnerable members throughout the state of Washington), where she is responsible for leading DEI strategic planning and execution across the organization.  She is the chair of the statewide Equity Council and serves on several community-led committees overseeing key priorities in advancing organizations with an anti-racism approach. She comes to us with over 17 years of DEI Leadership experience across the health and human sector with emphasis on health and racial equity and ensuring that culturally diverse communities live healthier lives and receive the care they need and deserve.

Jami Brown

Engagement Leader, Patient & Public Engagement. Jami joined Health Quality BC in February 2016, where she brings her passion for working with people to her role as an Engagement Leader. Prior to joining the Council, she led the communications and engagement strategy for the largest provider of seniors housing in British Columbia. Before that, she spent 10 years at Fraser Health leading a multidisciplinary team focused on creating healthier communities. Throughout her career, Jami has enthusiastically supported doing everything she can to draw on the richness of our collective experiences to build a health care system that works for everyone. Jami holds a Master of Arts in Professional Communication from Royal Roads University, a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Western Washington University and is a certified trainer in Public Participation and LEAN Healthcare.

Leigh Simmons, MD

Leigh Simmons, MD, is an internal medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

She is the Medical Director of the MGH Health Decision Sciences Center where she studies the use of decision aids to help patients and clinicians in the shared decision making process. Dr. Simmons develops and conducts training of physicians and staff in communication skills focused on improving decision making with patients. Her clinical practice is with the Internal Medicine Associates at Massachusetts General Hospital. In addition to her clinical and research interests, Dr. Simmons is a medical student educator and directs the internal medicine clerkship for Harvard Medical School students at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Missy Danforth

Missy Danforth is the Senior Vice President of Health Care Ratings at The Leapfrog Group, a Washington, DC based, not-for-profit organization representing the nation’s largest employers and purchasers of health benefits working to make great leaps forward in the safety, quality, and value of healthcare.

 

At Leapfrog, Ms. Danforth serves as member of Leapfrog’s senior leadership team informing Leapfrog’s strategic direction, engaging experts and stakeholders, and analyzing program results to engage purchasers and consumers and to drive safety and quality improvements. Ms. Danforth administers Leapfrog’s various measurement and public reporting activities including the Leapfrog Hospital and Ambulatory Surgery Center Surveys, the Hospital Safety Grade, Leapfrog’s Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Leapfrog’s new recognition program, which recognizes hospitals providing exceptional care for patients with diabetes, in partnership with the American Diabetes Association.

Ms. Danforth services on the governance board of Battelle’s Partnership for Quality Measurement (PQM), is the former chair of the National Quality Forum’s Consensus Standards Approval Committee (CSAC) and serves on various other national committees and technical expert panels. She is currently leading a four-year project to develop national standards for diagnostic safety and quality in hospitals.

Sian Hsiang-Te Tsuei, MD, Ph.D.

Dr. Sian Tsuei MHSc, MD, PhD, CCFP is a practicing Canadian family physician with Population Health Sciences PhD from Harvard University. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor (UBC), Adjunct Professor (SFU) and Visiting Scientist (Harvard University). He is currently a member on the Artificial Intelligence Advisory Group of the College of Family Physician of Canada. His research examines health systems change related to technologies. He is particularly interested in the how AI affects the behaviours of health care providers and patient, as well as how AI affects the provider-patient dynamics. His research is global in nature, and he has particular interest in the Asian and North American contexts.

We are pleased to invite interested sponsors to support our 21st annual conference. As a sponsor you are helping to subsidize the cost of the conference to healthcare staff and provide free attendance to patients, families, and students.

THIS YEAR’S PACKAGES OFFER SEVERAL LEVELS FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE.

Details of package benefits are described in the application.

  • Platinum Sponsor – $10,000 (1 available)
  • Gold Sponsor(s) – $7,500 (3 available)
  • Silver Sponsor(s) – $5,000
  • Bronze Sponsor(s) – $2,500
  • Supporter(s) of Patient Safety – $1,500

All sponsors will be recognized on the Washington Patient Safety Coalition website and marketing materials with sponsor logos linking to a webpage of your choice.

Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze sponsors have access to a dedicated page on the conference website which can include images, videos, links, etc.

Regional Collaborators

Silver Supports

 

Bronze Supporters

 

Supporters of Patient Safety

 

Coming Soon…

Coming Soon…

ART SPEAKS 

For the second year, WPSC’s Addressing Stigma & Bias Workgroup is featuring artwork as a powerful way to connect with patients’ experiences with health conditions. Our focus this year is mental illness & behavioral health. 

Art is not only beautiful, it is a potent medium of expression. Evocative and compelling, it touches the soul and connects in a way no other medium can.

Featured artwork this year include art and a poem by PNW residents Louie Gong, Mahvish Naqvi, Munira Leslie Sinclair and Anita Sulaiman as well as a poem by model-turned actress and mental health advocate, Cara Delevingne. Big thank you to the artists for sharing their compelling pieces with us.

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Visual Art

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ART PIECE: Black Sheep
Click here for a video showing the making of this piece

ARTIST NAME: Louie Gong
Click here for artist’s biography and link to Eighth Generation.

ARTIST INFO: Louie Gong (Nooksack) is the founder of Eighth Generation. A self-taught artist who was raised by his grandparents in the Nooksack tribal community in northwest Washington, he got his start by painting cultural art on shoes. 

Realizing that creating one-of-a-kind pieces did not provide a sustainable pathway to success, he began applying his artwork to accessibly priced products. His unique style merges traditional Coast Salish art with influences from his mixed heritage and urban environment to create work that resonates widely across communities and cultures.

Black Sheep is about drawing power from past experiences— even traumas. It is about self-care.

“I’ve been thinking about the term baggage, and it’s all wrong. When we think about our past experiences as something we can just put down, we can’t actually heal. The real pathway to becoming stronger and more confident versions of ourselves is to learn to live in symbiosis with our past experiences.”

The Black Sheep’s body is composed of Louie’s signature wolf-mouth motif, which he uses here to symbolize negative past experiences. It is painted loosely to indicate the frequent movement of and the idea that our past experiences are living parts of us that we can’t simply set down as if they were “baggage.” 

By contrast, the Black Sheep’s face is composed of highly structured Coast Salish design elements to indicate the self-confidence drawn from the understanding that past experiences make us better equipped to manage whatever lies ahead.  A few understated sprouts indicate constant growth regardless of what we are experiencing. 

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ART PIECE: Bleed Joy

ARTIST NAME: Tahira Naqvi

ARTIST INFO: I am a new artist venturing out to create artwork that speaks to mental health struggles. Childhood trauma is a big factor in my art, which is abstract and comes from the heart. It delves into deep wounds and the quest to achieve joy through self-reflection. I speak through colors and shapes that represent this journey of self-healing.

When I started on this piece, I did not know what to create, but I knew I wanted to display my pain, my joy, and my journey. So, I faced the canvas and decided to just let it flow. This piece has chaos, joy and a dark passenger. All representing the struggle between my child and adult selves. There is a hot air balloon. When I was little, I always wanted to escape. One day, I took my mom’s large shoe box and tied her red scarf to its four ends, after which, I walked out to our balcony and tried to leap off to go explore the world. Except, my grandfather saved me.

I have a natural instinct to leap forward and escape. It took cycles of anxiety to create this very personal piece. “Bleed Joy” is for everyone dealing with mental chaos and anxiety in their lives. My hope is that, by putting this out there, I will finally heal and find contentment. 

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ART PIECE: Untitled

ARTIST NAME: Munira Leslie Sinclair

ARTIST INFO: Munira Leslie Sinclair was a talented visual artist, eloquent writer & devoted mother to her children, including an adult son with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Much of her artwork was inspired by her struggles through some very difficult times as well as the unrelenting challenges of trying to ensure quality care for her son with special needs, in a system not well set up for patients like him. A passionate patient advocate, she worked to improve the lives of those with TBI through legislation & advocacy training. While she faced adversity & bouts of cancer with fortitude, art was her outlet. 

Leslie passed away on September 30, 2022. Special thanks go to her daughter, Jennifer, who has given WPSC’s Addressing Stigma & Bias Workgroup permission to share these 2 pieces with our audience. 

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ART PIECE: Safe Space

ART PIECE: Trapped

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART PIECE: Underwater

 

ARTIST NAME: Kaycia Ogata
Click here for artist’s biography and link to Eighth Generation.

ARTIST INFO: Kaycia Ogata is a graphic designer and illustrator, living and working in Portland, Oregon. Art has always been a form of therapy for her, as she lived with some depression and anxiety from a young age. Not being able to form the words she needed, she drew them. Underwater was created in remembrance of her mother’s passing when she was a child, and that sense of wanting to retreat deep into the ocean. Safe Space and Trapped were both created at the start of the pandemic, when the entire world locked down, capturing that sense of fear, isolation and uncertainty. More of her work – including design – can be found on her website

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ART PIECE: Freed: Dawning, Lightened, Lifted

ART PIECE: Bangau

ARTIST NAME: Baacooly

ARTIST INFO: Baacooly is a self-taught artist hailing from a small town in culturally rich Penang, Malaysia. She creates her art pieces in watercolour with a little mixed media thrown in. Female characters are her preferred subject matters, painted in the surreal style. They are often portrayed as seemingly lost in thought. She draws inspiration from her own experiences in life and whatever is tugging at her heart the most when she is working on her creations. Rather than explain her thoughts behind each piece, Baacooly prefers for her audience to draw their own conclusions & conjure their own stories when they view her paintings. More of her work can be found on her website

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ART PIECE: There Is No Patient Safety

ART PIECE: Wound? I Don’t See A Wound.

I’ve been fighting for my DMEs to be reinstated for six years now. Anyway, that’s what this drawing is about. I just shake my head at the stupidity of those in charge, making major medical decisions on peoples lives — like I said, if they had a brain, they’d seriously take it out and play with it. And the biggest crime of all, is all forgot to include the patient, or to remember that there’s actual human life involved.

ARTIST NAME: Marcía A.

ARTIST INFO: I am an artist, photographer, illustrator, and have 3 published children’s books. I’ve been a photographer for most of my life and a mixed media artist. I had my own studio/gallery for quite some time. The satirical write ups and sketches have been an outlet – especially through the frustrating nightmare of Health (don’t) Care in America, and most definitely in Washington state, and the stupid screwup with my DME six years ago. I think the sketches keep me from cussing a blue streak, which I’ve also done out of necessity. The Joint Commission and those that taught me how to be a proactive patient back in the 1980s, told me to speak up. They said if I’m not being heard or they’re not listening, to speak louder or shout, and if they’re still not listening — cuss a blue streak until you get their attention because it’s about your health and your life.

The purpose of life, is the life of purpose.
Practice random acts of kindness.

 

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Poetry

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EVERYTHING CHANGES

Everything is touched
by the sea of time.
We are life forms
on the shore
of existence.
 
No matter how you try
to be immovable,
time moves you.
It caresses you,
lulls you,
embraces you.
 
Just as you’re buoyed
into a comfortable slumber,
it snatches you,
pulls you out
& swallows you.
It swirls you around
& sucks you in.
 
Then,
just as suddenly,
it floats you,
breathless,
onto its surface.
 
The winds of change
calm to a whisper.
You feel it
cushioning you,
as you lay
adrift
with your face to the sky.
 
Then it stirs,
picks you up,
carries you
on a wave;
pushes you forward,
races you
back to shore
& deposits you,
gently,
onto the sand.
 
Glistening in the sun,
you catch your ragged breath. And settle down.
 
Before long,
you’re feeling the breeze
on your face,
looking up at the stars
& thinking:
I could stay like this forever.
You inhale the stillness…
 
Then it wakes you
from your reverie.
It foams
at your feet,
kissing your toes,
nudging you.
It teases you
into motion.
 
Slowly,
you move to the tide’s rhythmic touch,
sway to its hypnotic gyrations
& join,
again,
the dance of life.

Tomorrow becomes today.
Today becomes yesterday. Yesterday is but a memory.
Did we remember to live in today?

© 2020 Anita Sulaiman

POEM TITLE: EVERTHING CHANGES

ARTIST NAME: Anita Sulaiman

ARTIST INFO: Anita Sulaiman is Principal Consultant and Executive Coach at IBEX Consulting, whose areas of expertise include strategy, leadership development, marketing and change management/business process re-engineering. Anita is also a culture coach specializing in cultural competency and cross-cultural communication. Helping individuals and organizations excel in a global world is a passion.

Anita stays at the forefront of efforts to improve patient safety, serving on advisory groups and committees for organizations including the Washington Patient Safety Coalition, Foundation for Health Care Quality (Patient & Family Advisory Council) and Washington State Coalition for Language Access. She is Chair of the Addressing Stigma and Bias Workgroup, a partnership between WPSC and the Bree Collaborative, a healthcare non-profit established by the Washington State Legislature.

Everything Changes was written at a time of emotional turmoil. In the midst of personal upheaval, thanks to the practice of meditation to help with her mental health, this poem about the vagaries of time captures moments of clarity from seeing that change, while invariably very stress-inducing, are part of the ebb & flow of life.

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MOTHER

Mother
You are & you aren’t her
You’ve had to be mother & father
Did you know – you were the world to me?
Your eyes the window through which I see

Mother
Not a word to use in vain
So why are you my biggest source of pain?
You are the reason I am here
You are the idea I hold dear

What is this figure?
We call mother
What is this idea?
No other thing comes near

She is a hug
A warm embrace
Someone who’s there to kiss your face
To hold your hand
To wipe your tears
She’s there to chase away your fears

She is the reason
You stand strong
Can tell the difference between right & wrong
She is your shelter
From the storm
The well you get your reassurance from

At least that’s what
Everyone seems to think
They don’t know yours pushed you to the brink
Put you down
And cast you out
Always wished she could’ve done without

Mine gave me a bit of love
And a lot of hate
Served honey & poison on the same plate
Was never there
To kiss my face
But she made sure I always knew my place

I had no shelter
From storms or even rain
What I had
Would drive most people insane
There was no one
To wipe away my tears
I had someone filling my heart with fears

While you had hugs
Someone to hold your hand
I had to figure out where I stand
You always knew
Where you belong
All I was ever told was I was wrong

Wrong to want
To ask or to question
To live for others – that is my mission
You had wind beneath your wings?
Me?
Who am I to have needs or feelings?

While you had kisses
A friend & all
Someone to catch you when you fall
I had no right
To be happy
Yes, that was what she said to me

So don’t tell me
How I’m supposed to feel
You don’t know what for me is real
Don’t bother
To pile on the guilt
That’s the foundation on which I was built

All that said
Good comes with bad
She’s the only mother I’ve ever had
The person
Who instilled in me
All the good things that to this day you see

She taught me
Through trial by fire
How to prevail & always aim higher
Yes, I suffered
A million cuts
I also have the biggest heart of hearts

Mummy
If you only knew
All the love I have in my heart for you
To me
You gave birth
Yet for some reason
You don’t know my worth

I am
Pure love
A blessing
A gift from the Lord above
That is what babies are
Not a thing comes close
Not even by far

Today
I make peace
With all that was, will be & all that is
I can’t forget
But I forgive
You were only doing your best to live

In return
These things I ask
No more pretenses
Take off your mask
It’s time
Let go
Set yourself free
From who you think you’re supposed to be

I am trying
To do the same
Life is too short
For anger or for blame
I hope you see
That just like you
I am human
I’m doing my best too

All my life
Through all the hurts
I’ve been held to impossible standards
Now I know
It’s clear to me
Those high bars
Were what you were made to see

On this day
I hereby purge
I release
So we both can finally have peace

From here on
May we know
Acceptance
And a better tomorrow

Happy Mother’s Day.

© Anita Sulaiman 2023

POEM TITLE: MOTHER

ARTIST NAME: Anita Sulaiman

ARTIST INFO: Anita Sulaiman is Principal Consultant and Executive Coach at IBEX Consulting, whose areas of expertise include strategy, leadership development, marketing and change management/business process re-engineering. Anita is also a culture coach specializing in cultural competency and cross-cultural communication. Helping individuals and organizations excel in a global world is a passion.

Anita stays at the forefront of efforts to improve patient safety, serving on advisory groups and committees for organizations including the Washington Patient Safety Coalition, Foundation for Health Care Quality (Patient & Family Advisory Council) and Washington State Coalition for Language Access. She is Chair of the Addressing Stigma and Bias Workgroup, a partnership between WPSC and the Bree Collaborative, a healthcare non-profit established by the Washington State Legislature.

Mother’s Day is a tough one for me. This year, I struggled as I did in previous years. Except, this year, my mother, who recently turned 80, is very ill. Her condition has intensified for me all the emotions tied to her. This poem is dedicated to all who can relate.

Usually, the words just come. I have to scribble quickly & I am done. This time, I struggled. The words wanted to come out, but… Something in me resisted. I had to fight to let these truths out. To give them the light of day felt like giving my pain validity.

Writing down these words meant staring my trauma in the face. It meant ripping off the plaster. In the end, it was exactly what needed to be done. This is validation I needed to gift to myself. I am giving myself long overdue permission to feel, to acknowledge. It is what it is. No matter what people say, it’s ok. It’s not right, but it’s ok. With that realization comes release.

My poems are medicine to me. Sometimes they are light that shows the way – guidance from a place of pure love. Now I can start to heal, God willing.

This is my art; my outlet; expression from the deeper parts of me. This is my balm; my inspired remedy. This is healing for my soul. Poetry, for me, is all that & more. It’s my connection with the Divine. It is divine.


WHO AM I TRYING TO BE?

Who am I? Who am I trying to be?
Not myself, anyone but myself.
Living in a fantasy to bury the reality,
Making myself the mystery,
A strong facade disguising the misery.
Empty, but beyond the point of emptiness,
Full to brim with fake confidence,
A guard that will never be broken,
Because I broke a long time ago.
I’m hurting but don’t tell anyone.
No one needs to know.
Don’t show or you’ve failed.
Always okay, always fine, always on show.
The show must go on.
It will never stop.
The show must not go on,
But I know it will.
I give up. I give up giving up.
I am lost.
I don’t need to be saved,
I need to be found.

POEM TITLE: WHO AM I TRYING TO BE?

ARTIST NAME: Cara Delevingne

ARTIST INFO: Cara Delevingne, actress and model, shares her personal experiences with anxiety and depression.